Posts Tagged ‘heritage’

Don’t count us out just yet.

May 7, 2010

The flood has us down, but working hard to get up.     In 2006, the Lexington Herald-Leader ran a feature on our village of Paint Lick and entitled it “Don’t count it out “. Four years and one big flood later has some of our first generation residents worried about the village they have come to love. Debbie Parker has worked harder this week at Friends than most anyone. Loraine came home Monday singing her praises and saying what a God-send she was. Yesterday she showed me something she had sat down and written to share the burden of her heart.      

Debbie (on the right) sorting the wet clothes with Janet.

By Deborah Parker- May 5, 2010 

IT IS NOW THREE DAYS since the flood and I’m thinking, “ Will this be the nail in the coffin of our little town of Paint Lick”? 
 
I moved to this community known as Paint Lick in February, 1960, from the coal fields of Harlan County. My dad was a coal miner. It was a thriving community of three grocery stores, a post office, the mill, Peoples Bank, two service stations, a restaurant, the Sportsmen’s club Eva Lee’s beauty shop, Earl Nave’s barber shop, J.R. Television repair. . .just to name a few of the one’s from the memories of a young child. As the years went by there have been numerous floods,fires, and tornadoes that caused changes both good and bad. The bad economy almost got us in the eighty’s, but still our heart was beating strong. We lost the Ashland station about this time. We are a community that cares about each other. When a tragedy happens, the people of Paint Lick are there lending a helping hand. Rumors began to circulate that we were losing our post office, but thank God, at least for now we still have her.
  
 In the late ’80s and early ’90s we lost the grocery stores of Calico and Brown, and Herlin McQuerry’s.The mill is long gone. About that time, The Friend’s of Paint Lick was formed by Dean Cornett who was also responsible for praying Doctor John Belanger to Paint Lick. He and his staff has provided us with the Family clinic which also suffered extensive damage. The bank changed to First Southern and we got a world-class wood shop in the person of Don Weber. He came to us from Wales via California, in an old green Chevrolet truck. Don has brought national attention (television) to Paint Lick. Of course it was Dean Cornett as one of President George Bush, Sr’s, “Point of Lights” recipient that first gained national attention for Paint Lick.
 
 So many people who have been a vital part of our community are no longer with us: Joe and Helen Adams, Dud and Eva Lee Hurte, Charlie and Maxine Brown, Franklin Dillion, Lucien, Geneva, and Ralph Starnes, Maggie and Otis Gooch, Jessie and Gladys Miller, Rudy Hensley, and others too numerous to list here. All are still remembered as a vital part of our heritage. Now we are in the twenty-first century and we have lost our restaurant to a fire and no longer have a station that sells gas. The days of the post office is on it’s way out.
 
 I guess what I’ve been trying to say is that the heartbeat of Paint Lick seems to be fading. Only we, the community can act as a defibulator to shock it back to a healthy condition. I don’t want Paint Lick to just be a memory. We dare not let this flood be the occasion that delivers the death toll. Let’s do something, whatever it takes to show there is still life here where we live, play, and work. I care deeply about my community and am willing to join others to get the heartbeat strong and dynamic.
 
As the saying on Dean Cornett’s truck reminded everyone that saw it- “Press on Regardless!” Let that be our rally cry as we work together to bring back the life-force to Paint Lick.
  Related article in 1991 New York Times about Katie Rollins and the hard times Debbie speaks of in the ’80s in Paint Lick.
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Paint Lick’s Welchman

March 15, 2010

2010Don Weber

Don Weber is a Paint Lick treasure in every sense of that word. He has helped us here at Friends so often that we need to give him his official volunteer badge.

What many of you may not know is that Don comes from another culture and I know he must get homesick now and then. For Don, I have put up this video in, a wonderful traditional Welsh hymn . And for the rest of you who have never encountered this rich people and their heritage let this be a wake-up call. I imagine that not a few of the original Kentucky pioneers were Welch transplants.

Thinking of you Don this Lenten season. Thank you for the richness that you and your lovely wife Beth bring to our lives and community.

Visit Don’s woodwright-shop. Right here in the Village.

A real treasure in Paint Lick

October 15, 2009

A Transplanted Bodger from Wales

don1

All our friends are special here in Paint Lick. One of my favorite transplants- those “not from around here”, has to be Don Weber. Don is always ready to help out around the Friends of Paint Lick and in the village at large. He is a highly skilled craftsman in a specialized area of wood working and he uses his skills not only to make beautiful furniture, but in promoting the old crafts to the younger generation.

From his web-site, he tells us about this passion.

“I spend a great deal of my time in the mountains tracking down Appalachian craftsmen and working in the schools to keep these traditions alive. Using traditional technology as an “appropriate technology,” I also work in developing countries and economically depressed areas, setting up projects using local materials and talent to create cottage industries with other craftsmen and women, in an ecologically and environmentally-friendly manner.”

Go on over to the Handcraft Woodworks and get to know Don and see some of his work in the Gallery.

There is a PBS special Craft in America that you might want to take a look at after seeing Don’s work. It will help you to realize how privileged we are to have Don in Paint Lick.

The Carpenters Wheel at Friends

September 11, 2009
The Quilt Greeting on Friends Building

The Quilt Greeting on Friends Building

As you enter the village of Paint Lick from Madison county, crossing the famous Paint Lick Creek, you can’t help but notice one of our most recent projects. It’s part of what is called “The Quilt Trail” and it is a fitting symbol for the Friends of Paint Lick blog. We are grateful to all those that made this a reality-from the first dream stage to the final mounting by some very brave men.

For those interested in the story of how this project all came together and just how many friends of Paint Lick were involved see this article that Ike Adams wrote last year for The Appalachian Connection (a .pdf scroll down to page 6). Ike does a good job of tying the pattern chosen to Dean Cornett and local history.

You may not realize this ties our little Village to a new national event known as the Heritage Corridor Quilt Trail. (explore the other quilts in Garrard County)

“We all have to push to keep the wheel rolling!” – Dean Cornett